Posts Tagged ‘code’

Want to learn all about Xamarin and how you can use it, while not spending most of your time watching code scroll by in a video? I figured there was room for an explainer without being a close-captioner for a code tutorial. Enjoy my latest video!

https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=AhvofyQCrhw

From the description, along with links:

Have you been considering Xamarin for your cross-platform mobile app? This presentation will help.

In this non-code-heavy presentation, we’ll discuss:

* What is Xamarin
* Development Environment Gotchas
* Creating a Sample To Do List App without writing any code
* Reviewing a real Xamarin app that’s “in the wild”
* Review native, platform-specific integrations
* Discuss gotchas when using Xamarin, and mobile apps in general
* Answer audience questions

Why not code-heavy? Because there are many examples you can follow online. This presentation will provide valuable information you can consider while reviewing the myriad of tutorials available to you with a simple Bing or Google search, or visiting Pluralsight, Microsoft Virtual Academy, or Xamarin University.

If you have any feedback, please leave in the comments, or ask me on Twitter: @Auri

Here are the links relevant for this presentation:

Slides: https://1drv.ms/p/s!AmKBMqPeeM_1-Zd7Y…

Indy.Code Slides with Cost and Performance Figures: https://1drv.ms/p/s!AmKBMqPeeM_1-JZR4…
(you can find the Indy.Code() presentation on my YouTube channel)

Google Xamarin vs. Native iOS with Swift/Objective C vs. Android with Java Performance Article: https://medium.com/@harrycheung/mobil…

Example code for push notifications, OAuth Twitter/Facebook/Google authentication, and more: https://github.com/codemillmatt/confe…

Link to Microsoft Dev Essentials for $30/month free Azure credit and free Xamarin training: https://aka.ms/devessentials

Microsoft Virtual Academy Multi-Threading Series: https://mva.microsoft.com/en-us/train…

 

I’ve noticed students feel learning object oriented programming appears tough when first exposed to structured development practices. To add insult to injury, boring example relationships like “people” and “students” and even types of fruit and their plant family relationships are used to show how objects relate to each other. I’m more in the camp believing learning “scary” new concepts should be fun, even memorable. People tend to remember good jokes, and forget dull experiences. I experimented with an approach to OOP. I used the old children’s storybook, Everybody POOPs.

We’re all human beings. All Humans eat and drink, and everybody poops. It takes a system to get to the pooping stage. We also fart. Adults fart and say excuse me!, while children fart and giggle. They’re still Human. Hopefully you can see how these related entities can be turned into computer classes.

I finally got around to recording a video of my teaching this concept, as it relates to classes in Microsoft’s C#. Student reactions are always enjoyable. Most of the time, they laugh,ย and have fun. I usually get compliments that it’s a lot easier to remember because it’s funny. Some people are disgusted I would talk about such a topic in class – I’m thinking those people don’t have a sense of humor. No photos are involved, so what’s the big deal?

Watch the Video

Here’s my original Blog Post about it

I was challenged last year to write a JavaScript version of Everybody Poops. I finally got around to that this year, explaining objects to students at the TeKY Initiative. That was a bit tougher, since JavaScript isn’t really object oriented. Still, it was fun. The students even got me a poop emoji mug ๐Ÿ™‚ You can view the code here. You’ll need to use the console to play with the object.

I’m continuing to teach concepts in [what I feel are] fun, real world ways. My first step has been to create “Real World Programming” videos on YouTube. Two are complete as of this article – OOP (link above) and Inversion of Control + Dependency Injection. I hope to do a few more in 2017 as time permits. If you have a suggestion, please let me know!

I’ve been using this example for a couple years now – explaining Object Oriented Programming with a cute example based on the book Everybody Poops. It’s fun, and much less bland than the other OOP examples I’ve seen ๐Ÿ™‚

Here’s the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0PFHaX04mo

In case you missed the first video on Inversion of Control and Dependency Injection: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcJN1XCs8t0

This is the second video in my Real World Programmer series. I hope you enjoy!