Type the following command from an admin command prompt:

reg add HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\SynTP\Parameters\Debug /v DumpKernel /d 00000000 /t REG_DWORD /f

I’ve been having this problem with Visual Studio. Alt-Shift-L is a common shortcut for finding the location of a file in your solution. However, on a Lenovo laptop, pressing that key combo also stores debug log info for the touchpad driver. Pretty annoying, totally useless, and no UI element to turn it off.

Found this helpful article:

A note: Don’t call Lenovo support. My gosh, they transferred me 3 times, each time to the wrong department. Thank heavens for the Internet.

From their forums: https://forums.lenovo.com/t5/ThinkPad-X-Series-Laptops/How-to-disable-touchpad-diagnostics-hotkey-alt-shift-l/td-p/2176730

 

Micro Adventure was a series books in the 1980s where you had to write computer programs to get from chapter to chapter. It was a great way to learn coding for a geeky kid looking for a good story related to computers. A few months ago, I was granted rights to use the books on a website, and now it’s in beta! Check out the site and let me know what you think!

https://microadventure.net

 

I’m pretty proud of this. Working on the app with the City of Fishers’ support, we’ve brought home a Mira Honorable Mention. After less than a year, we have thousands of users and two six arrests, with hundreds of incidents reported by Fishers residents. Pretty cool. Our team deserves it for all their hard work! Special thanks to Ed Gebhart, Mayor Scott Fadness, Chiefs Mitch Thompson and George Kehl, and the officers and citizens who continue to provide feedback to make this service even better for our community. 🙂

IBJ Article: https://www.techpoint.org/2017/04/mira-awards-winners-2017/

Mira Award Plaques

A little technical detail on the app, for those who are interested:

Platform: Xamarin with Xamarin.Forms, so we only had to write it once to deploy to iOS and Android. Yes, it really works.

Development Window: 18 months. Includes test runs with officers and the community.

Language: C#.

Time to Deploy to Google Play Store: Less than 15 minutes.

Time to Deploy to Approve Apple Developer Account: 3 months. They wouldn’t believe we were the City. Even with a phone call from the Mayor. That was an experience!

Time to Approve App, once we were in: 3 days. They were pretty cool after we were approved. 🙂

 

Want to learn all about Xamarin and how you can use it, while not spending most of your time watching code scroll by in a video? I figured there was room for an explainer without being a close-captioner for a code tutorial. Enjoy my latest video!

https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=AhvofyQCrhw

From the description, along with links:

Have you been considering Xamarin for your cross-platform mobile app? This presentation will help.

In this non-code-heavy presentation, we’ll discuss:

* What is Xamarin
* Development Environment Gotchas
* Creating a Sample To Do List App without writing any code
* Reviewing a real Xamarin app that’s “in the wild”
* Review native, platform-specific integrations
* Discuss gotchas when using Xamarin, and mobile apps in general
* Answer audience questions

Why not code-heavy? Because there are many examples you can follow online. This presentation will provide valuable information you can consider while reviewing the myriad of tutorials available to you with a simple Bing or Google search, or visiting Pluralsight, Microsoft Virtual Academy, or Xamarin University.

If you have any feedback, please leave in the comments, or ask me on Twitter: @Auri

Here are the links relevant for this presentation:

Slides: https://1drv.ms/p/s!AmKBMqPeeM_1-Zd7Y…

Indy.Code Slides with Cost and Performance Figures: https://1drv.ms/p/s!AmKBMqPeeM_1-JZR4…
(you can find the Indy.Code() presentation on my YouTube channel)

Google Xamarin vs. Native iOS with Swift/Objective C vs. Android with Java Performance Article: https://medium.com/@harrycheung/mobil…

Example code for push notifications, OAuth Twitter/Facebook/Google authentication, and more: https://github.com/codemillmatt/confe…

Link to Microsoft Dev Essentials for $30/month free Azure credit and free Xamarin training: https://aka.ms/devessentials

Microsoft Virtual Academy Multi-Threading Series: https://mva.microsoft.com/en-us/train…

 

I’m continuing my resolution to record as many of my programming and technical presentations as possible. I recently spoke at the inaugural Indy.Code() conference. It was excellent, with an incredible speaker line-up. I hope they, too, post some of their presentations online!

Watch the Video on YouTube

From the synopsis:

Should you write your app “native” or use a “cross-platform” solution like React Native, Xamarin, or NativeScript? The new wave of native-cross-compiling solutions provide significant cost savings, code reuse opportunities, and lower technical debt. Does wholly native, per platform development, still play a role in future mobile development? Let’s discuss together.

In this presentation, we’ll discuss:

  • The growth of native, hybrid, and cross-platform mobile development solutions
  • Cost analysis of multiple native and cross-platform apps
  • Considerations for each native and cross-platform solution
  • Lessons learned

Slides are available here: https://t.co/5iLhEoEfen

If you have any questions, I’m happy to answer them! Please email me or ask on Twitter.

 

“If you can read this, thank a teacher.” That was a poster in my 3rd grade classroom. They never said it would be “read this code.” Now that I’m teaching others to code, I can see why teachers continue to do their work, even if the career’s financial benefits aren’t in line with the value they add to society.
Take TEKY for instance. 50 people started to learn to code. 35 graduated after 9 weeks of instruction, and 7 more weeks of practicing what was preached. The teaching staff was paid a fixed amount. Those students? Off to careers paying $60K+ annually. Even for $100K of instruction – I don’t know what the total was – those students will have a huge impact on the economy many times that of the instructional investment. They’ve been launched from the nest, with incredible potential to live a better life than what the coal industry that abandoned them could offer. So the teachers hope for their “devlings,” and will teach another class to read and write code, and watch them grow and leave again.
It’s a bit heartbreaking. I still remember the jokes we told, the laughs and difficulties we shared as they learned, struggled, got up again and again, then got it. My fellow instructors I’m sure endured the same. You *want* them to succeed. And you’ve made dozens of friends along the way. They’re still your kids, though. They’re going to live their own lives, as careers, and once in a while you’ll reach out to each other to see how you’re doing. They’ll do great – you know that. Like a parent. They’re thankful – but they have a job to do, so they go do it. That pool of connections, of successes, grows. And I feel all teachers are greatly humbled by it. That’s real world change, simply by providing time, mind, and experience.
And maybe, someday, those students will become teachers, and receive the same joy and sense of pride we teachers do.
Dammit, “Cats in the Cradle” is in my head now.
Links to the graduation and open house videos:
Very proud!
-Auri

I’ve noticed students feel learning object oriented programming appears tough when first exposed to structured development practices. To add insult to injury, boring example relationships like “people” and “students” and even types of fruit and their plant family relationships are used to show how objects relate to each other. I’m more in the camp believing learning “scary” new concepts should be fun, even memorable. People tend to remember good jokes, and forget dull experiences. I experimented with an approach to OOP. I used the old children’s storybook, Everybody POOPs.

We’re all human beings. All Humans eat and drink, and everybody poops. It takes a system to get to the pooping stage. We also fart. Adults fart and say excuse me!, while children fart and giggle. They’re still Human. Hopefully you can see how these related entities can be turned into computer classes.

I finally got around to recording a video of my teaching this concept, as it relates to classes in Microsoft’s C#. Student reactions are always enjoyable. Most of the time, they laugh, and have fun. I usually get compliments that it’s a lot easier to remember because it’s funny. Some people are disgusted I would talk about such a topic in class – I’m thinking those people don’t have a sense of humor. No photos are involved, so what’s the big deal?

Watch the Video

Here’s my original Blog Post about it

I was challenged last year to write a JavaScript version of Everybody Poops. I finally got around to that this year, explaining objects to students at the TeKY Initiative. That was a bit tougher, since JavaScript isn’t really object oriented. Still, it was fun. The students even got me a poop emoji mug 🙂 You can view the code here. You’ll need to use the console to play with the object.

I’m continuing to teach concepts in [what I feel are] fun, real world ways. My first step has been to create “Real World Programming” videos on YouTube. Two are complete as of this article – OOP (link above) and Inversion of Control + Dependency Injection. I hope to do a few more in 2017 as time permits. If you have a suggestion, please let me know!